Tag Archives: 4/5 Stars

Review: Keeping It Real by Justina Robson (Quantum Gravity Book One)

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Keeping It Real by Justina Robson (Quantum Gravity Book One)
2007, Pyr

Review Summary: Overall I enjoyed the book a great deal, but was just a little disappointed with how it skated over quite a few things to pursue an almost purely action story – and was also a little let down by the “James Bond” ending.

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Review: Bone Crossed by Patricia Briggs

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Bone Crossed by Patricia Briggs
2009, Ace

Review Summary: Briggs delivers another page-turner, staying true to her characters and keeping enough grit and reality in her mix so that we can empathize with her characters at the same time that we admire them. An outstanding effort, and I once again look forward to the next installment of the series.

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Review: Yvgenie by C.J. Cherryh

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Yvgenie by C.J. Cherryh
1991, Del Rey

Full Review: Yvgenie manages to bring Cherryh’s The Russian Stories full circle to a kind of resolution – at least as much of a resolution as is possible with such a tangled skein of wishes and loyalties and loves. The setting is the same, and again the characters are stumbling about amid the forest and flying wishes, against unknown antagonists, but the author manages to bring in some additional characters with enough of a twist to make the story compelling one final time.
03/02/09 CSL

Review: The Yiddish Policemen’s Union by Michael Chabon

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The Yiddish Policemen’s Union by Michael Chabon
2007, HarperCollins Publishing

Review Summary: More speculative fiction than traditional science fiction or fantasy, Michael Chabon’s The Yiddish Policemen’s Union nevertheless deftly utilizes one of my favorite elements of those genres, the “what if” scenario, playing out experiments in human psychology, sociological relationships, and ethics, by twisting the rules slightly and seeing what results.

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Review: Chernovog by C.J. Cherryh

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Chernovog by C.J. Cherryh
1990, Del Rey Books

Review Summary: Chernovog is effective in a way that Rusalka never quite achieved, more than likely because it is limiting the scope of the story being told. The storyline, the characters, and the themes being explored are all more focused and the result is a tighter, and easier to follow read.

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